Anatomy & Physiology 2 Lab, Final Quiz Questions

Questions are short answer or identification; some may require calculations
Blood Pressure | Electrocardiogram | Blood | Thoracic Anatomy | Blood Cell Identification | Immune System Histology | Sheep Heart Anatomy

Blood Pressure
1.   Define systolic blood pressure.
2.   Given a blood pressure of 110/80, what is the mean arterial pressure?
3.   Assuming a stroke volume output of 60 ml at rest that increases by 15% after exercise, and a heart rate of 72 at rest and 120 following exercise, calculate the cardiac output standing at rest and immediately after exercise.
4.   Define hypertension.
5.   What is correct spelling of the device you used to measure blood pressure?
6.   The specific gravity of mercury 13.6 times that of water. If your blood pressure were 100/50 mm Hg, what would that be in cm H20?
7.   Which is the better indicator of the diastolic pressure reading:  Korotkow Phase 2 or Korotkow Phase 4?
8.   After exercise, did the mean arterial blood pressure increase?
If so, was this due to an increase in systolic or diastolic pressure?

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Electrocardiogram
1.   When the electrode pads are placed on the subject, where is the positive electrode placed?
2.   You can calculate your heart rate in two ways. First, you could simply count the number of pulses for a given time period and adjust that to the number of pulses per minute. Or, you could measure the cycle time of the cardiac cycle. If you measure the cycle time to be 0.625 sec, what is the heart rate?
3.   The lab exercise reports two ways to calculate your maximum heart rate. How did the calculation 60÷(Q-T interval) compare with that using your age?
4.   What does the T-wave of the ECG represent?
5.   Suppose you find the following:  Cycle time, 1.0 sec; P-R interval, 0.2 sec; QRS interval, 0.07 sec; Q-T interval, 0.33 sec. What is the duration of ventricular diastole?

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Blood
1.   Using the ABO-Rh blood typing system, list the possible phenotypes.
2.   What blood-group antibodies would be circulating in the blood of a nulliparous A- female?
The same woman after giving birth to an Rh+ child?
3.   What are the possible genotypes of an individual with B+ blood type?
4.   If you are healthy and have anti-B antibodies and anti-Rh IgG molecules circulating in your plasma, what is your blood type?
5.   Using Punnet squares, determine the probability of O- offspring from the mating of an A+ (phenotype) female with a B+ (phenotype) male

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Thoracic Anatomy

  rat heart in situ

  rat heart in situ

  In addition to the indicated structures, identify the major blood vessels, thymus (if present), and diaphragm.

  These images are borrowed from Rebecca Irwin, Associate Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Tennessee at Martin
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Blood Cell Identification
1.   Using these pictures as your guide, be able to identify the indicated blood cells:

    basophil
basophil

    eosinophil
eosinophil

    monocyte & neutrophil
monocyte and neutrophil

    monocyte
monocyte

    lymphocyte
lymphocyte

    These images are borrowed from the Blue Histology,
    School of Anatomy and Human Biology — The University of Western Australia.
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Immune System Histology
1.   Using these pictures as your guide, be able to identify the specified immune system organs:

    tonsil
tonsillar crypt

    lymph node
lymph node

    spleen
spleen

    thymus
human fetal thymus

    These images are borrowed from the Blue Histology,
    School of Anatomy and Human Biology — The University of Western Australia.
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Sheep Heart Anatomy
1.   Using these pictures as your guide, be able to identify the labelled structures:

    external view of sheep heart, undissected

    internal view of sheep heart

    internal view of sheep heart AV valves

    These images are borrowed from the Biology Department, North Harris College, Houston.
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